By Michael Simmons, Guest Writer

Full Article Here: https://www.entrepreneur.com/slideshow/247157

Productivity tips come in all shapes and sizes.

Just look at Warren Buffett, a man considered one of the best investors in the history of human civilization. But what might be more impressive than his track record is his schedule. It is the exact opposite of what you’d expect out of the CEO of a $350 billion company. It has been reported that he generally reads for 80 percent of his day and spends the rest having one-on-one conversations with long-time friends who happen to be CEOs of the companies that Berkshire owns, according to the book The Outsiders. This has been his schedule for decades.

Warren avoids investor events, industry conferences and other activities that take up the time of most CEOs, according to the book. Instead he’s created a lifestyle where he can focus on what he does best and loves to do, control his schedule and work with people he respects and admires.

But this regimen doesn’t work for everyone. So I interviewed 10 leaders and asked them how they stay productive.

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5. Say no by default

“In 2013, I wrote two bestselling books, made the Inc. 500 list and sold one of my companies for seven figures, all within a 40-hour work week. These were my only big goals, and I blocked out most of my time everyday to make sure I moved toward them.

A key to my approach is being good at saying no to tasks unrelated to my goals, even when they are extremely tempting or easy to do. This took me years of practice. The fastest way to get good at saying no when being pressured to commit is to say something like, ‘If you need an answer from me right now, I’m sorry, but I would have to say no. If you can wait until I have my goal setting time later this week, I may be able to say yes but no promises.’

I then review these decisions bi-weekly in the context of my existing goals and commitments.”

Benji Rabhan, founder of AppointmentCore